Honoring Animal Control Professionals

In this blog, I am continuously exploring and suggesting new approaches to capturing and handling dogs.  The most proficient individuals who do this are animal control officers and I wish to make it very clear that I honor their skills, knowledge, and experience.

Rescuing Dogs After Hurricane Katrina

It is common around the world for the village or city or regional animal control to hire the poorest, least educated dog catchers to do what is perceived as the dirty work.   There is no sense of humane treatment or animal protection.  And  in some countries, especially where rabies is endemic and dogs run the streets, there is a bounty for people to bring in as many dead dogs as they can.  I have seen photos of a motor scooter with 5 dead dogs piled across the front and back.

Here in North America, the National Animal Control Association and state ACAs have developed strong professional programs “to define and promote professionalism in the animal protection care and humane law enforcement field by providing quality services, education, training, and support.” (from NACA Mission Statement)  I believe they have developed the highest standards in the world and fortunately their achievements are improving the standards in other nations. Continue reading

NEW FERAL DOG HANDLING COURSE IN MASSACHUSETTS, May 26-27

I am excited to announce that I will be teaching a two day humane feral dog handling course in Springfield, Massachusetts specifically for the animal control officer, shelter worker, and disaster responder.  This is the most extensive course in handling fearful dogs. This is an essential course for professionals addressing hoarding cases, responding to disasters, handling fearful dogs in shelters, assisting with trap/neuter/release programs, and rescuing dogs in general.

This course is a product of my experience handling over 2,000 feral dogs throughout the world including the Caribbean, India, tribal lands, and rescue operations after Hurricane Katrina.

O Connor dog course Announcement Here are details about the course.  The course is limited to 40 people. Visit our website Seminar Schedule for more information and for registering.   Either register on-line or by mail.  Feel free to contact me if you have any questions  at mjohnson (at) wildliferesources (dot) org.

Please note:  I will also be teaching this humane feral dog capture course in Seattle in June, 2010. The specific dates and locations are yet to be determined.

Mark